Archive for the 'Education in our Home' Category

Our Mantle Adorned with Traditions of Lent

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Our Lenten Traditions (from left to right): In the trunk, our “Alleluia” banner is buried until Easter morning, where it will adorn our mantle proclaiming Christ’s Resurrection and the Great Feast of the Church. (During Lent the “alleluia” is no longer proclaimed during the Mass. How great it is on Easter Morning to hear it thundered through the church!!!)

On top of the trunk is a vase for Alms. The children earn this money by doing Charity Chores that are jobs not included in their regular responsibilities but which they can choose to do in order to earn money for the poor.

Next to the trunk is a blessed candle that we light during our family prayer time reminding us of our prayers raising to the throne of God.

Beside that is a vase labeled Works of Mercy with a bowl of beans next to it. When the children perform a Work of Mercy or a good deed, they may place a bean in the jar. On Easter this vase will be filled to the brim with jelly beans symbolizing how Jesus can take what good works we offer him and transform them by His grace into something even sweeter and more beautiful than we can imagine!

In the center is a shadow box with a crucifix and some other mementos. This was a gift I made for my husband’s birthday. It has a great story behind it (which I might share another time).

Wrapped in the purple cloth is our Easter candle with has a holy card with an Agnus Dei sealed to it. It will remain wrapped in this shroud taking on the symbolism of our Lord’s body lying in the tomb until Easter morning when the children wake discovering it unshrouded and blazing with light.

Below the Our Lady of Grace statue (which is always holding a place of honor on the mantle) is a Crown of Thorns made from a grapevine wreath and toothpicks that were dyed with coffee. (If I were to dye these again I would use tea.) This is labeled with the word Penance. As we place the thorns ( toothpicks) in the crown (wreath), we discuss how each one represents our sins and the sins of the whole world. We discuss ways we can make reparation to God for these sins and the sins of others through sacrifice, prayer and by offering the Holy Mass for this purpose. An exceptional book to read to go along with this activity is The Weight of a Mass; A Tale of Faith.

Here is a peek into our home last Easter morning:

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The Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes

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Yesterday, in honor of Our Lady appearing to St. Bernadette 150 years ago, we visited the Lourdes Marian Center to pray in the grotto and to receive miraculous water from the spring where Our Lady told Bernadette to dig.

After receiving a tour of the center we headed over to the John Paul II Center for a Lourdes storytime and craft. The younger children made these shrines:1dscf1156.jpg

and the older children made these:

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This was a great way to conclude last weeks pilgrimage to Our Lady Lourdes Parish to pray the jubilee prayers after receiving the Sacrament of Confession and attending Mass at Holy Ghost Parish.

Lenten Lessons

 

As we do every year during Lent we focus our learning around the season and prepare our hearts & minds for our Risen Lord. Here is some of what we have planned:

Family Activities

Morning Read Aloud– Alternate between A Life of Our Lord for Children by Marigold Hunt & An Illustrated Catechism by Inos Biffi

Family Read AloudThe Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare

Science/Nature StudyGrow bulbs and grass seed in Easter baskets- Contrast the dead looking bulbs & seeds with Christ’s death and the flowers and grass with Christ’s resurrection. Record growth in nature journals.

Bird Study– Put out feeders and record birds spotted. Research different feed for different to attract different birds. Research what is needed to make our yard a welcoming habitat for birds. Hang birdhouses before spring.

Butterflies-Order Painted Lady Caterpillars & Pavilion. (Order Feb. 24 for Easter transformation.) Study metamorphosis. Visit the Butterfly Pavilion. Research what is needed to make our yard a welcoming habitat for butterflies.

Family Project-Create a Rosary Prayer Book-(Religion, History, Grammar, Handwriting, Copy work, Art, Picture Study, Latin, Math for the Littles) – Using the Magnificat Rosary Note Cards & a scrapbook to create a Rosary Prayer Book to be used by the family.

Copy work for the Rosary Book-

Rosie– Apostle’s Creed, Hail Mary, Concluding Prayer

Galadriel– Our Father, Doxology- English & Latin, Hail Holy Queen

Eowyn– Fatima Prayer

Picture StudyRosary Note Cards, Stations of the Cross

Art– Rosary Prayer Book, Nature Journals

Music AppreciationLingua Angelica, Women in Chant, Chant from the Hermitage, Chant

PoetryA Child’s Wish by Abram J. Ryan

GeographyFootprint of God Videos (History& Catechesis), Drive Thru History; Rome If You Want To (History)

Study maps of the Holy Land, Ancient Rome & Greece

Special Devotions-Family Rosary, Friday Stations of the Cross, Our Lady of Lourdes Indulgence, St. Valentine’s Day Tea

Field Trips– Lourdes Marian Center & Lourdes Story time, The Butterfly Pavilion, Little Flower’s Stations of the Cross, Visit the Community of the Beatitudes to learn about our Jewish Roots (Call to schedule.)

Foreign LanguagePrima Latina, Lingua Angelica

Directed Reading/Narration
RosieVictory on the Walls by Frieda C. Hyman

Written Narration- D’Aulaires Book of Greek Myths

GaladrielThe First Christians with oral narrations

EowynPhonics Pathways– Review Vowels with games.

Math
RosieMastering Mathematics

GaladrielMastering Mathematics

Veggie Tales

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Here it is…our raised vegetable garden! Planted in the barren soil are lettuce, radish & zucchini seeds. At the left four bamboo posts are sugar snap peas and runner beans. To the left of the runner beans is an eggplant. The three large plants are tomatoes. In front of the tomatoes are three strawberry plants. The two plants behind the tomatoes are pumpkins. And the three plants on the far right are peppers. Marigolds are interspersed amongst the tomatoes.

Last night we fertilized with fish emulsion and bone meal which is in addition to the many bags of manure already mixed in to the soil. After fertilizing, we gathered for a prayer over the garden and blessed it with holy water. St. Isadore, pray for us!

The Vino has Arrived!

Fed Ex, rang and ran, leaving the BOGO 2003 Rosso from Puglia Italy on the porch. I’ve been eagerly anticipating it’s arrival as my 4Reallearning friends & I gear up for a virtual wine tasting. BOGO stands for buy one, give one which is so appropriate for a company that donates $2 for every 9L case sold, to adult stem cell research. (For clarification: The Catholic Church supports adult stem cell research and only opposes research that is immoral such as embryo research where the embryo is intentionally destroyed. Visit here for more information regarding bioethics.)

 The other wine we are tasting (per my suggestion as I already had it in the fridge) is a Aquinas Napa Valley 2005 Chardonnay which was named for St. Thomas Aquinas, a revolutionary scholar in the 13th century who used the laws of science to support his belief in the Almighty.

To educate myself on wine I’ve been using these resources from the library: Introduction to Wine Tasting with Bob Betz, Master of Wine and Jancis Robinson’s Wine Course. I enjoyed both of these and in turn have come to enjoy the intricacies of wine as well! I highly recommend both resources.

The Denver 4Reallearner’s will be gathering together for the tasting and I will post our review here on House of Grace for everyone to enjoy. Cheers!

St. Agatha-Pray for Us!

Today we honor St. Agatha, virgin and martyr, who for love of Christ remained pure and chaste even in the face of horrendous torture.

Click on the link to read what Catholic Culture tells us about this holy women.

We plan to honor this couragous Saint by making a bread wreath, as bread is one of her symbols. We will attach prayers written on paper to the wreath, with a special intention for our dear neighbor who has been fighting breast cancer for the past 4 years. We will take the bread to mass tomorrow to have it blessed by a priest and then hang it in our kitchen near the window which faces our friends home. It will serve as a sacramental, reminding us to pray for St. Agatha’s intercession for the healing of our neighbor’s body.

For dinner we will be serving Pasta e Fagioli which is a red wine & tomato based soup with white northern beans & shell pasta. The red is symbolic of St. Agatha’s martyrdom and the white beans, of her purity. The seashell of course is an ancient symbol of baptism and reminds us to pray for the grace to live out our baptismal promises even in the face of difficulties and tribulations.  Our martyr candles will be lit as well to illuminate this picture which has a prominent place in our home, as well as in our hearts.

St. Agatha, pray for us!

Snow Activities

Here are some science activities we are planning on doing that correlate with our Winter Reading.

Snowflake Imprints

This project is done outdoors during a snowstorm. We plan on doing this several times during the winter, recording the weather conditions and their effect on the type of snowflakes. We will be recording: temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction, each time we make imprints.

Materials: Shoebox with lid, Acetate (Grafix Clear Film) cut to fit inside shoebox, Krylon plastic spray (we choose blue), cardboard cut to the same size of acetate, wooden spring clothespins (two per project)

Important: Keep all materials in the freezer for atleast 1 hour before doing the project.

  1. Place acetate on the cardboard and secure with clothespins.
  2. Spray acetate with Krylon. Work Quickly!
  3. Allow a few snowflakes to land on the acetate.
  4. Place acetate in the shoebox and cover with a lid so no more snow falls on the acetate.
  5. Leave outside for atleast 1 hour to allow the Krylon to dry.
  6. When dry, a replica of the snowflakes will be left on the acetate.
  7. Observe replica snowflakes with a hand lens or a microscope.
  8. You may want to classify the snowflakes using Ken Libbrecht’s Field Guide to Snowflakes.
  9. If you keep a nature journal you might want to draw a picture of your snowflake with a ruler and protractor.

Some questions to ponder: What type of crystals formed? Is there more than one type? How big are the crystals? Are any alike?

Borax Snowflakes

We found this activity at Home Science Tools. They are a wonderful supplier of science equipment for homeschooling families.

Make real crystal snowflakes to decorate your home using borax. This activity takes about 30 minutes of active preparation and then overnight to set.

Materials

  • Wide mouth jars – one for each snowflake (can reuse to make more snowflakes)
  • Pipe cleaners (Depending on the size of the jar, you may be able to cut one piece into three smaller pieces. Use the diameter of the jar’s mouth to measure how long the pipe cleaners need to be. Use white pipe cleaners to make traditional snowflakes, or use colored pipe cleaners and food coloring for more colorful snowflakes.)
  • String
  • Scissors
  • Pencils – one for each snowflake (have as many pencils as you have jars)
  • Water
  • One-cup measuring cup
  • Borax such as 20 Mule Team Borax Laundry Booster
  • Food coloring – don’t need this if making traditional white snowflakes

Procedure

  1. For each snowflake, twist together three pipe cleaners in the center so that you make a 6-pointed star. Use scissors to trim down the ends of the pipe cleaners so they are all approximately the same length and can fit in the jar.
  2. Take a piece of string and tie it to one end of the star. Connect the string to the next point by twisting the string around the pipe cleaner. Continue around until you connect all the points together with the string, making a snowflake shape.
  3. Attach one of the pipe cleaner points with string to the shaft of the pencil. You should use just enough string so that when the pencil is resting on the mouth of the jar, the snowflake can be lowered into the jar and hang suspended without touching the mouth or the sides of the jar. Place the snowflake in the jar to make sure that it will fit and will hang suspended inside the jar. Take the snowflake out of the jar.
  4. Use a teakettle or microwave to boil enough water to fill each of the jars. When adding the water to the jars, measure out how many cups of water are needed to fill the jar. For every cup of water placed in the jar, mix in three tablespoons of borax. This will make a super saturated borax solution. (If using the optional methods below, add the food coloring in with this step.) Stir the borax solution with a spoon until dissolved.
  5. Hang your snowflakes in the jars so that they are completely suspended in the solution. Let your snowflakes sit overnight. Gently remove your now crystal covered snowflakes.

Optional: Try these methods to make your snowflakes even more unique!

  • Use colored pipe cleaners and food coloring to make different colored snowflakes. Use three pink pipe cleaners and one drop of red food coloring to make pink snowflakes, or green pipe cleaners and several drops of green food coloring – you get the idea. You may also want to try using yellow pipe cleaners and blue food coloring to make a greenish tinted snowflake or use different colors of pipe cleaners. Have fun making several different color combinations.
  • Make different designs or patterns with the string and the pipe cleaners. Make two circles to connect the pipe cleaners or try zigzagging between the points. Use thread or thin string for more intricate patterns.

Melt Snow

  • Weigh a quart size jar. Record weight.
  • Fill jar with clean snow. Weigh jar. Record weight.
  • Predict and mark where the melted snow water will come to on the jar. Measure with a ruler and record prediction.
  • Cover containers.
  • Predict how long it will take for the snow to melt.
  • Check on containers periodically until all the snow has melted. Record time.
  • Record weight and water levels of the melted snow in thier containers.
  • Discuss the results.
  • Now test the melted snow for purity. Pour the melted snow through a clean coffee filter.
  • Pour distilled water through a clean coffee filter.
  • Discuss results.

Snow Imprints and Snow Melt were adapted from Project Seasons.

No Snow? No worries. How about a Blizzard in a Bucket? Not up for a Blizzard? Try this, Instant Snow in a Test Tube.


Rocky Mountain Catholic Home Educator’s Conference

June 21-23, 2007 http://www.rmchec.org/

The Glory of God is man fully alive! -St. Irenaus

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